Ontario Catalyst Skills Project -Updates2018-10-05T20:46:53+00:00

Every Higher Ed graduate can develop capability for Workplace Innovation

Our current activity in Higher Ed to foster Innovation Leadership – social innovation
incubators, entrepreneurship boot camps, etc. – won’t scale up to allow all our students to
become ‘critical friends and catalysts’ for Innovation in the Workplace. But we can tackle this
challenge where all of them already participate: in our teaching and learning classrooms.

By: Thomas Carey

Providing Students with Experiential Learning in Workplace Innovation – in our Classrooms

We can identify four levels of learner engagement with workplace innovation in our higher
education classrooms, from the individual activity level all the way up to our culture around
teaching and learning.

By: Thomas Carey

In our best Higher Ed programs, students encounter a progressive trajectory of new
knowledge and new knowledge practices. If we reframe these experiences as innovations in a
workplace for learning, we can help them recognize – and transfer – the capability they are
developing to engage with changes to their tasks and roles in the workplaces of the future.

By: Thomas Carey

As more programs adopt our T-Shaped learning approaches, Liberal Arts programs will have
to adapt if we want to maintain our graduates’ distinctive value as new employees. By
demonstrating how the interdisciplinary fluency developed through the Liberal Arts can
contribute to responsible innovation in the workplace, we can go beyond T-shaped learning
and reclaim a critical role for our Liberal Arts grads in the workplaces of the future.

By: Thomas Carey

Innovation has become an intensely desired thing in today’s business world, but the
perception of what innovation is and how to get it leads many start-ups and some larger
companies into the “Innovation Trap”, as described by Karel Vredenburg, IBM’s Global
Director of Design.

By: Karel Vredenburg

Due to its name, design thinking is often confused with design itself, and due to its more
intangible nature, often has its worth questioned. Karel Vredenburg, director of Global Design
at IBM, clarifies by distinguishing Design as a specialist capability versus Design Thinking as
an orientation and skill set transferable across work contexts and expertise domains.

By:Karel Vredenburg

When a company has gone through a design transformation, all parts of the organization
start to use design thinking as a matter of course. They start to think and act differently. Karel explains
what this had meant to IBM and gives examples of other organizations undergoing Design
Transformation.

By:Karel Vredenburg

Due to the impact and depth that design thinking has had on IBM as a business, a recognition
program has been created to identify the level of training in design thinking that an employee
has, and identifies the level of engagement they have with it. IBM’s Karel Vredenburg
describes the way this program works, and the impact it has had on the company.

By:Karel Vredenburg

In some organizations, “design thinking” has developed a bad reputation due to
misconceptions about what it is and how it. IBM’s Global Director of Design, Karel
Vredenburg, writes about failures in practice of design thinking, and describes the essential
ingredients to make Design Thinking viable at the Enterprise level.

By:Karel Vredenburg

Karel Vredenburg has given keynote addresses, and even developed and co-taught entirely
new programs and courses at universities such as McMaster University on Design Thinking.
He writes on how students have reported it changing the way they think, and describes how it
can extend a student’s skill-set past what is traditionally taught in the classroom and provide
them with the ability to succeed in their discipline, regardless of what it is.

By:Karel Vredenburg